A Personal View on AI-Generated Image... A Personal View on AI-Generated Images After a Tumultuous YearThe core of this year in the entertainment industry and its intertwined challenges with AI can be seen other than the legality of scraping or other legal issues; those topics have been explored and still will. I wanted to have a different angle and question AI's actual value.I focus here on the artistic dimension, the heart of the website, services, and events I've been involved with for over ten years. After experimenting with various tools and solutions and browsing multiple services, I still believe that the benefits of using AI to generate images from scratch are still worth nothing.I've observed a surge in websites and social media groups filled with AI-generated images, which often feels like a dive into a nonsensical world from an artistic standpoint. The trend of generating numerous images quickly and trying to market them cheaply only reinforces my belief that this reliance on AI for image creation is a trap. It benefits mainly the SaaS companies offering these services to hobbyists for a monthly subscription.In a recent interview, the CEO of a trendy AI video generation company looking for funds says he prefers targeting the general public over professionals, which illustrates this shift. People who couldn't create an image from scratch now feel empowered yet gain little in return—no recognition, and if they attempt to sell their work, it's at rock-bottom prices, contributing to a market flooded with cheap AI images.This isn't a new phenomenon. We see similar patterns in large malls where mass-produced, framed images from stock photo libraries are sold cheaply. It's the same with the deluge of photographs available for next to nothing.The actual value of an image, illustration, or photograph lies in the idea, concept, composition, storytelling, and numerous other factors. Regardless of quality, an automated image or video cannot replicate the process involved in creation—the trials, errors, iterations, and decision-making that culminate in a finished artwork.Those fixated on the result miss the essence of art, perceiving it merely as a consumable product. In contrast, carefully composed and conceived images reflect the creative process and the creator's personal choices, emotions, and experiences.So, I would like to end with a positive note; in a landscape oversaturated with subpar or quickly produced images, it becomes ever more apparent that the actual value of artistry, born from meticulous craftsmanship and profound creativity, shines brighter than ever before.Now is the moment for artists to dedicate effort to showcasing their abilities and the authenticity of their artistic journey to communicate positively.As always, I remain committed to supporting this endeavor through my engagement on various websites, social media platforms, and events I oversee.
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in 🎨 share-your-art
January 04

Hi! This is my first post in this community.
I'm Gonzalo, a freelance artist from Argentina.
Currently working on Books, TCGs, RPGs, and board games.

Cover art - Time of Dragons, written by Liliana Bodoc.
© Penguin Random House, 2022

6
in 🛷 discussions
June 13

Worst and Most Damaging Advice You Could Give to Artists About Their Online Presence

Many artists feel pressured to establish an online presence quickly in today's fast-paced digital world. However, this rush often leads to bad decisions and misguided strategies. Below, we will explore some of the worst advice circulating among artists about their online presence and why it can be detrimental.

Some advice and examples may sound repetitive, but I've tried to explore them from different angles.

Misconceptions About Establishing Social Presence

Social Presence Needs Time

- Bad Advice: "You can build your online presence in a few weeks if you follow the right strategy."

- Reality: Establishing a meaningful social presence takes time. Even with a solid strategy, it typically requires at least three months to see significant results. Patience and consistent effort are crucial.

Bet on One Platform

- Bad Advice: "Pick one social media platform and put all your efforts there."

- Reality: It's risky to rely solely on one Platform before confirming it will work for you long-term. Diversify your presence to safeguard against platform changes or failures.

The Dangers of Following Bad Advice

Switching Platforms Too Soon

- Bad Advice: "Leave your current platform and join this new one immediately!"

- Reality: New platforms may not have a guaranteed future. Leaving established platforms can lead to losing the audience and progress you've already built. Such advice is particularly harmful to young or inexperienced artists who might not recover from the setback.

Confusing Young Artists

- Bad Advice: "Follow the latest trend without question."

- Reality: Young artists are already navigating the complexities of AI and other technologies. Misleading them with poor advice adds to their confusion and can hinder their growth and development.

Losing Established Presence

- Bad Advice: "Abandon some of your social media accounts."

- Reality: If you've spent time building a presence on a platform, abandoning it can erase your efforts and disconnect you from your audience. Maintaining consistency across platforms ensures that your work remains visible.

Understanding Social Networks and Audience Reach

Restricting to One Network

- Bad Advice: "Stick to one social network to build a dedicated following."

- Reality: Restricting yourself to one Platform limits your audience reach. Each social network attracts different demographics, and expanding your presence helps you reach a broader audience.

Targeting Only Artistic Communities

- Bad Advice: "Only post your work on artist-specific social networks."

- Reality: While these platforms are valuable, they often cater to the same audience. To grow, you need exposure to a larger, more diverse audience, including potential clients, collaborators, and recruiters.

Job Seeking Strategies

- Bad Advice: "Post your portfolio only on art-focused job boards."

- Reality: Recruiters and studios use a variety of platforms to find talent. By limiting your job search to niche networks, you miss opportunities that exist on broader, more general job platforms. ( some artists don't even post on linkedin where most of the recruiters are )

The Public Nature of Your Posts ( More a basic Reminder )

Remember, What You Say is Public

- Bad Advice: "Express all your thoughts and feelings openly on social media."

-Reality: Many people still don't realize that most social networks make their posts public. Posting strong opinions or negative comments can harm your reputation. Future recruiters and clients might see your posts and form a negative impression of your mindset. Being mindful of your public persona and how your posts reflect on you professionally is essential.

Avoiding Negativity

- Bad Advice: "It's okay to vent your frustrations frequently on social media."

- Reality: Constantly complaining or posting harmful content can create a negative perception. Recruiters and clients look for positive, solution-oriented individuals. Negative posts might lead them to question your attitude and professionalism.


Establishing an online presence as an artist requires thoughtful strategy and patience. Avoiding the pitfalls of bad advice can help you build a sustainable and impactful digital presence. Remember, diversification, consistency, and understanding your audience are key to long-term success in the digital realm.

Succeeding on social networks necessitates time and strategy. If you're serious about this, consider dedicating at least half a week to planning your content and another half day to creating it. If you're not prepared to invest this time, avoid the frustration of saying, "I post there, but it doesn't work." It's not about quantity but consistency. It's better to start by planning one or two posts per week and maintaining that rhythm than to post daily and then run out of content for weeks. Consistent, well-thought-out posts will help you build a loyal and engaged audience over time.

By avoiding the damaging advice outlined above and committing to a consistent, strategic approach, artists can navigate the online landscape more effectively and achieve their professional goals.

in 🛷 discussions
December 30, 2023

A Personal View on AI-Generated Images After a Tumultuous Year

The core of this year in the entertainment industry and its intertwined challenges with AI can be seen other than the legality of scraping or other legal issues; those topics have been explored and still will. I wanted to have a different angle and question AI's actual value.

I focus here on the artistic dimension, the heart of the website, services, and events I've been involved with for over ten years. After experimenting with various tools and solutions and browsing multiple services, I still believe that the benefits of using AI to generate images from scratch are still worth nothing.

I've observed a surge in websites and social media groups filled with AI-generated images, which often feels like a dive into a nonsensical world from an artistic standpoint. The trend of generating numerous images quickly and trying to market them cheaply only reinforces my belief that this reliance on AI for image creation is a trap. It benefits mainly the SaaS companies offering these services to hobbyists for a monthly subscription.

In a recent interview, the CEO of a trendy AI video generation company looking for funds says he prefers targeting the general public over professionals, which illustrates this shift. People who couldn't create an image from scratch now feel empowered yet gain little in return—no recognition, and if they attempt to sell their work, it's at rock-bottom prices, contributing to a market flooded with cheap AI images.

This isn't a new phenomenon. We see similar patterns in large malls where mass-produced, framed images from stock photo libraries are sold cheaply. It's the same with the deluge of photographs available for next to nothing.

The actual value of an image, illustration, or photograph lies in the idea, concept, composition, storytelling, and numerous other factors. Regardless of quality, an automated image or video cannot replicate the process involved in creation—the trials, errors, iterations, and decision-making that culminate in a finished artwork.

Those fixated on the result miss the essence of art, perceiving it merely as a consumable product. In contrast, carefully composed and conceived images reflect the creative process and the creator's personal choices, emotions, and experiences.

So, I would like to end with a positive note; in a landscape oversaturated with subpar or quickly produced images, it becomes ever more apparent that the actual value of artistry, born from meticulous craftsmanship and profound creativity, shines brighter than ever before.

Now is the moment for artists to dedicate effort to showcasing their abilities and the authenticity of their artistic journey to communicate positively.

As always, I remain committed to supporting this endeavor through my engagement on various websites, social media platforms, and events I oversee.

1
in 🎨 share-your-art
March 25

Humbaba, the guardian of the Cedar Forest.
In Sumerian mythology, Humbaba was a fearsome creature tasked with protecting the sacred cedar trees. In the epic of Gilgamesh, he faced the hero Gilgamesh and his companion Enkidu in a legendary battle.

This art is part of "The Magnificent Book of Monsters," published by Weldon Owen.

in 🎨 share-your-art
December 14, 2023
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Mood Concept Art #1 - The Lord of the Rings : Return to Moria

Here are some mood concept art pieces created for The Lord of the Rings™: Return to Moria™. This marked my first significant experience as a concept artist in the video game industry, and it was fun to illustrate and delve deeper into the mines of Moria.

Art Director: Bradley Fulton
Ⓒ 2022 Free Range Games. All rights reserved.


1
in 🎨 share-your-art
January 11

Ancient Ritual

A personal project created to test and practice kitbash techniques a year ago.

2
in 🎨 share-your-art
January 12

Hi! This is my first post here 😊
I'm Miha and I'm currently working on a MV and personal projects.
I will visit IAMAG in Paris, and I'm already very excited to be part of it. On the ticket it says "first flight phoenix", so here's a phoenix 🔥

1
in 🎨 share-your-art
February 23

Value comp for a personal project. I have a ton of these already, this project will be massive, I cannot wait to develop it and publish it :)

in 🛷 discussions
February 23

Does any one know where to find art of Total War: Pharaoh? Funny how as soon as an Ubisoft game is out, the art immediately floods the internet, but Creative Assembly doesn't do so. Here and there is a character design, but that's also it. Or am I missing something?

2
in 🎨 share-your-art
March 06

Protector of the North
Completed this piece last month from a key word challenge
Used Clip studio paint